Restoration of a Frederic Remington Ink Drawing

June 27th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

This ink drawing on paper by Frederic Remington had been improperly framed. As a result the artwork exhibited severe acidic burning in the image area from the mat as well as adhesive and paper residue at the bottom margin where the mat had been adhered directly to the front of the artwork. These acid and adhesive stains are damaging to the artwork and have a negative effect on the visual impact of the piece.

Frederic Remington Ink Drawing Before Restoration

Frederic Remington Ink Drawing Before Restoration

To conserve this artwork, first all pigments were tested for solubility to ensure the stability of the artwork. The drawing was then gently surface cleaned to remove any superficial dirt. The glue residue and paper fiber were removed by humidifying the artwork to dissolve the adhesive. The dark, acidic staining were cleaned on a cold suction vacuum table. The artwork was then rinsed and dried under weight.

Frederic Remington Ink Drawing After Restoration

Frederic Remington Ink Drawing After Restoration

Conservation of an Antique Engraving

May 14th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

This steel plate engraving and mezzotint illustrates the hazard of utilizing acidic backing materials when housing artwork. In this case, wooden slats were originally utilized. Looking closely, one can observe the acidic staining patterns in the sheet that follow the edges of the slats and the knots in the wood.

After the inks on the surface were tested for stability, the staining was reversed by cleaning and bathing the artwork and giving the artwork a thorough surface cleaning. The artwork was then strengthened with sizing and dried under weight for a period of days, gradually wicking out all the remaining moisture in the paper.

Josey Steel Plate Engraving Before Conservation

Josey Steel Plate Engraving Before Conservation

Josey Steel Plate Engraving After Conservation

Josey Steel Plate Engraving After Conservation

Restoration of a Max Beckman Ink Drawing

May 14th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

This ink drawing by Max Beckman exhibited severe staining about the margin caused by a wood pulp face mat. The artwork had also been stained throughout due to improper housing in an acidic environment. Pressure sensitive tapes had been applied to the verso, causing additional localized staining.

To treat the artwork, first all pigments were tested for stability. Once the pigments were found to be stable, the paper tapes were removed with methyl cellulose and the pressure sensitive tapes and resultant staining were removed with a gentle solvent on a cold-suction vacuum table. The artwork was then gently cleaned and rinsed to remove any remaining staining. To complete the process, the paper was strengthened with sizing and then flattened under weight for a number of days.

Max Beckman Ink Drawing Before Conservation

Max Beckman Ink Drawing Before Conservation

Max Beckman Ink Drawing After Conservation

Max Beckman Ink Drawing After Conservation

Restoration of an Antique Pabst Brewing Co. Chromolithograph

April 9th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

This antique Pabst Brewing Co. Chromolithograph exhibited severe discoloration and staining throughout, including acidic darkening and embrittlement of the sheet caused by the original wood-slat backing material and moisture staining about the margin. Numerous tears were also apparent at the margin with accompanying pigment and fiber-loss.

Pabst Brewing Co. Chromolithograph before restoration.

Pabst Brewing Co. Chromolithograph before restoration.

Before treatment, all pigments were tested for solubility to ensure a safe restoration. All tears were backed locally using a thin Japanese tissue and a pH neutral, starch-based adhesive. The staining was removed by rinsing the artwork with water on a cold-suction vacuum table, pulling the staining directly out of the fibers of the paper. All staining was treated locally on the vacuum table with a fine airbursh to avoid the sensitive pigments. The paper was then backed with mulberry tissue and sized with gelatin to lend stability to the weakened sheet. All tears and voids were replaced with paper fiber and all pigment losses were replaced with archival pigments.

Pabst Brewing Co. chromolithograph after restoration.

Pabst Brewing Co. chromolithograph after restoration.

Restoration of a Beurdeley Drypoint Etching on Paper

April 9th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

This drypoint etching on paper exhibited a severe reverse mat burn, scattered foxing throughout the sheet, time staining, and severe creases at the margin.

Jacques Beurdeley etching before Restoration.

Jacques Beurdeley etching before Restoration. Etching exhibits severe mat burn about the image area and severe scattered foxing throughout. Also, not visible in this photograph, the margins of the paper were folded behind the sheet.

The etching was cleaned and flattened utilizing aqueous treatments. The severe creases at the margin were removed by humidifying the sheet, reinforcing the areas with methylcellulose, and flattening the artwork under weight for a period of days.

Jacques Beurdeley etching before Restoration.

Jacques Beurdeley etching before Restoration. Image appears smaller because the restored margins are now visible that had been originally folded behind the sheet.

Cleaning an Oil Painting on Milboard

April 9th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

This oil painting on millboard had become severely discolored and warped over time due to extended exposure to both moisture and smoke. Particles of Sludge had become embedded in the darkened varnish.

Oil on Millboard before restoration.

Oil on Millboard before restoration.

This painting’s darkened varnish was removed. The surface was gently surface cleaned, and a new ultraviolet filtering, archival varnish was applied to protect the delicate pigments on the canvas.

Oil Painting on Millboard after restoration work.

Oil Painting on Millboard after restoration work.

Audubon in the Home

April 4th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

John James Audubon artwork in its natural habitat.

This client purchased two of our Audubon Watercolors from the New-York Historical Society Edition and framed them in beautiful gold leaf frames.

“We love our Great Egret! It’s beautiful and ‘makes’ the dining room! I think the Egret and the Pelican really complement each other! Thank you so much for all of your help!”

If you are interested in having your Audubons or natural history art on our website, please submit photographs and a brief description to doppen@audubonart.com.

Audubon Watercolor  Pl. 251 - Brown Pelican

John James Audubon Plate 251 – Brown Pelican Framed in a Handsome American Colonial-Style Moulding

A touch of wildlife and antiqued gold frames can add charm to an already elegant dining setting.

A touch of wildlife and antiqued gold frames can add charm to an already elegant dining setting.

Audubon Watercolor Pl. 29A- Great Egret

John James Audubon Plate 29A – Great Egret. This rare rendering by Audubon was never published in his final double elephant folio. Framed in a traditional American Whistler frame..

Restoring a Woodbury Painted Miniature on Ivory

April 4th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

This Antique miniature on ivory had become detached from its mount over time.  Because of its loose state, multiple pigment losses around the margin of the miniature had occurred over time.  The soft batting and silk liner had also decayed over time.

Woodbury Miniature Before Conservation

Woodbury Miniature Before Conservation

The miniature was treated with a gentle surface cleaning, all pigment losses were replaced around the margin of the ivory element, the ivory was reattached to the interior of the locket with heat-activated, archival adhesives, and the decayed silk batting and liner was completely replaced to protect the miniature from further deterioration and lend a finished look to the antique.

Woodbury Miniature After Conservation

Woodbury Miniature After Conservation

Color Matching the Bien Book

March 30th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

Final Day of Printing the Bien Book

March 29th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

Good morning from Verona, Italy!
It is our final day on press and we wanted to show you the first press sheet of the day (which has the title page and frontispiece of our book) with the printing press in the background. Alessandro Saccomani, who is holding the other end of the sheet, and Roberto Marani standing beside him, have been wonderful partners in printing the book since our arrival at Elcograph (formerly Mondadori) Printing a week ago Wednesday. We were told that this is the largest book they have ever printed in their over 100-year history.
IMG_0596